The Latest

Oct 20, 2014 / 27,800 notes
Oct 20, 2014 / 4,165 notes

vintagegal:

Backstage at the 1954 Pierre Balmain Couture show. Photos by Mark Shaw.

(via shouldaputaringdingonit)

Oct 20, 2014 / 13,196 notes

(via brewskee)

eartheld:

freebecauseofhe:

planstobesurprised:

hopefisch:

I would adore having a space like this

SHOOT. We’re getting a loft. I decided.

I would love to live in a loft


The yoga I would do here oh my god
Oct 20, 2014 / 50,603 notes

eartheld:

freebecauseofhe:

planstobesurprised:

hopefisch:

I would adore having a space like this

SHOOT. We’re getting a loft. I decided.

I would love to live in a loft

The yoga I would do here oh my god

(via nerf-gun-russian-roulette)

txnk:

creativehouses:

West Village Studio
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Dream living
Oct 20, 2014 / 7,951 notes

txnk:

creativehouses:

West Village Studio

Read More

Dream living

(via gentlemanbro)

Oct 20, 2014 / 89 notes

(via empauror)

Oct 20, 2014 / 8,436 notes

(via onefitmodel)

Oct 20, 2014 / 34,158 notes

kelledia:

Yuanyang rice terraces, China.

(via joshpeck)

onefitmodel:

want want want
Oct 20, 2014 / 86,802 notes

onefitmodel:

want want want

Oct 20, 2014 / 1,303 notes

(via letsgetf1t69)

Oct 20, 2014 / 2,372 notes

(via kushkarma)

Oct 19, 2014 / 2,278 notes

(via nulyu)

terminologist:

vintage/nature
Oct 19, 2014 / 204,129 notes

terminologist:

vintage/nature

(via brewskee)

boyirl:

Eliza Bennett - A woman’s work is never done, 2011Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.
Oct 19, 2014 / 90,429 notes

boyirl:

Eliza Bennett - A woman’s work is never done, 2011

Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.

(via shutupgladys)

untrustyou:

Christina Hoch
Oct 19, 2014 / 27,289 notes